Transmission: Automatic

Engine Type: 5Lt V8

Engine Number: QT791331

Build Date: 09/76

Odometer Reading: 179140 Kms Showing

Genuine Matching Number Car, owned by current owner approximately 9 years and was repainted prior to his ownership.

Originally sold new in Ballarat, Vic

Very hard car to find… very limited build number (approx 600).

Running an Edelbrock Manifold.

Power Steering Pump and Box has been rebuilt.

Refurnished 8 Track & Radio (all working), speakers replaced (all working), All windows working,
instruments working (except clock)

Original Honeycomb wheels with trim ring (hard to get)

Air filter replaced.

Gold Stripe painted (not decal)
Air conditioning missing compressor
Rear demister not working
Lower section of front seats retrimmed

One of the rarer opportunities in our catalogue and the first we’ve had the opportunity to sell.

 

Holden’s decision to close the current chapter of the Monaro legend with a special limited edition model evokes memories of 1976 when the company also chose to give the first generation coupe a special send off. Like today’s CV8-Z the LE Coupe was a limited edition model.

Holden realistically said from the outset that it expected the high demand for the new generation Monaro would slow once the pent up demand was satisfied. In the minds of the men in charge it was never a given that the Monaro would go on forever.

Debate today rages over the name of the LE, specifically on whether it’s a Monaro or not. Officially Holden never labelled it a Monaro, and it never carried Monaro badges, but time has blurred the picture and it’s now generally referred to as a Monaro by enthusiasts.

Officially the last coupe of the first generation was an LE, for Limited Edition, which denoted the fact that just 600 would be built. Holden’s marketing people described it as a luxury town car with sports car performance. In other words it was a luxury sports coupe with the emphasis on luxury.

The LE was a blend of Monaro LS and Caprice luxury sedan. Holden’s then head of design, Leo Pruneau had more influence over the LE than anyone and he fitted it with every feature he could, which helps explain why it was the most expensive Holden you could buy at the time.

Outside, the LE was readily distinguished by its metallic red paint, gold pinstripes and LE badging, and gold honeycomb wheels lifted straight from the Pontiac parts bin.

Inside, it had red velour trim with plaid inserts in the seats, matching deep cut pile carpets, liberal splashes of burr walnut over the dash and centre console, and a sporty three-spoke steering wheel.

The list of standard features was extensive for the time, and included air-conditioning, power windows, power antenna, push-button radio, and quadraphonic cassette sound system.

To protect your investment vehicle bidders should consider at a minimum replacement of fuel, oil, fluids, filters and thorough brake inspection as vehicles may have been stationary for some time. Vehicles are sold as is off the floor – unregistered. No warranty expressed or implied, sold with all or any faults, and where applicable sold with Australian Government Import Approval.

Holden’s decision to close the current chapter of the Monaro legend with a special limited edition model evokes memories of 1976 when the company also chose to give the first generation coupe a special send off. Like today’s CV8-Z the LE Coupe was a limited edition model.

Holden realistically said from the outset that it expected the high demand for the new generation Monaro would slow once the pent up demand was satisfied. In the minds of the men in charge it was never a given that the Monaro would go on forever.

Debate today rages over the name of the LE, specifically on whether it’s a Monaro or not. Officially Holden never labelled it a Monaro, and it never carried Monaro badges, but time has blurred the picture and it’s now generally referred to as a Monaro by enthusiasts.

Officially the last coupe of the first generation was an LE, for Limited Edition, which denoted the fact that just 600 would be built. Holden’s marketing people described it as a luxury town car with sports car performance. In other words it was a luxury sports coupe with the emphasis on luxury.

The LE was a blend of Monaro LS and Caprice luxury sedan. Holden’s then head of design, Leo Pruneau had more influence over the LE than anyone and he fitted it with every feature he could, which helps explain why it was the most expensive Holden you could buy at the time.

Outside, the LE was readily distinguished by its metallic red paint, gold pinstripes and LE badging, and gold honeycomb wheels lifted straight from the Pontiac parts bin.

Inside, it had red velour trim with plaid inserts in the seats, matching deep cut pile carpets, liberal splashes of burr walnut over the dash and centre console, and a sporty three-spoke steering wheel.

The list of standard features was extensive for the time, and included air-conditioning, power windows, power antenna, push-button radio, and quadraphonic cassette sound system.

To protect your investment vehicle bidders should consider at a minimum replacement of fuel, oil, fluids, filters and thorough brake inspection as vehicles may have been stationary for some time. Vehicles are sold as is off the floor – unregistered. No warranty expressed or implied, sold with all or any faults, and where applicable sold with Australian Government Import Approval.